Facebook’s Algorithm Shift Means a Shift in Strategy for 2018

As our society’s social media usage grows, the power the medium holds to persuade the population grows in kind. This is evidenced in the role that Facebook and Twitter play in politics and social movements and the money that brands and news organizations have invested in creating a strong presence on these platforms. President Trump regularly utilizes Twitter to voice his policy and opinion, most recently responding to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s nuclear threat by tweet. Social movements have thrived on social media, rallying followers with Facebook groups and hashtags. New York Times writer Amy Chozick suggests in her recent article “Hillary Clinton Ignited a Feminist Movement. By Losing.” that national feminist movement #MeToo was ignited, in part, by the poor treatment of Hillary Clinton on Facebook during the 2016 presidential race. Brands have flocked to Facebook and Twitter because that’s where consumers are spending their time and advertising agencies have developed marketing campaigns around engaging those audiences through Facebook.

My team and I do this by developing messaging, images and video targeted to engage a brand’s existing and potential audiences.


In my role as Art Director at Sands Costner, I’ve worked with a handful of brands to expand their reach through social media. My team and I do this by developing messaging, images and video targeted to engage a brand’s existing and potential audiences. We put together posting schedules, build audiences through Facebook’s paid ad platform and boost posts to users who fit their target demographic. Many of our marketing plans for 2018 have a social media component, but just this week Facebook announced a change in their algorithm–the code behind post priority for its News Feed–that may have a profound effect on brands ability to reach their followers. Aimed at making content more relevant to users, these changes will prioritize posts that friends and family share and comment on over posts from brands’ and news organizations. The announcement has left advertisers like myself scrambling to understand the ramifications for our customers who planned to leverage the platform to engage audiences in the coming year.

Zuckerberg said in the announcement that people will likely spend less time on the site due to these changes, but if the time spent makes them feel better it will benefit users and brands alike.


Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg said in the announcement that people will likely spend less time on the site due to these changes, but if the time spent makes them feel better it will benefit users and brands alike. Facebook’s persuasive power and market share are undeniable. With users in the United States averaging 50 minutes per day on the site now, a shift to more meaningful interactions could, in fact, benefit brands. In the meantime, our strategy is to ensure content for the brands we manage is all about engagement. Posts will ask questions to spur conversation and feature customer stories to make sure Facebook users have content worth interacting with. Our role as marketers is to engage audiences across all platforms. Doing this well on Facebook will keep our brands in News Feeds and in front of the audiences we’ve worked hard to build over the years.

Want some help creating engaging content or fine tuning your social media strategy?